Totalities (2019)

Totalities is a series of paintings that began in 2019 for the exhibition Forged and Other Forms. Central to this new works is the desire to inform abstract fields of color using data visualization techniques that reflect on capital accumulation regimes.

Untitled #1 (Total Capitalization in 2018) gathers a selection of data on the global economy in 2018. The blue field corresponds to the derivatives market and occupies most of the canvas as a clear evidence of the scope of this type of instrument financial. The source of the data is varied and includes datasets from the World Bank, Bloomberg, Coinmarketcap, Ministry of Economy of Brazil, among others.

Untitled #1 (Total Capitalization in 2018) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2019

Untitled #2 (World’s Imports and Exports, Works of Art, HS97, 2009-2018) is composed of a diptych gathering information on the art trade between different countries over 10 years. The data was obtained with the World Trade Organization.

Untitled #2 (World’s Imports and Exports, Works of Art, HS97, 2009-2018) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | diptych | 20x20 cm (each) | 2019

Untitled #3 (Shares of World GDP, 1800-2030) points to a change in the distribution of wealth among macro-regions of the world over a period of more than 300 years, including temporal highlights, and also a forecast that reaches the year 2030, where it is noted a return of Chinese hegemony in the global economic scenario. The data was obtained in an OECD Publishing report.

Untitled #3 (Shares of World GDP, 1800-2030) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2019

Untitled #4 (Value and Estimated Profit of 10 Most Cost-Effective Asteroids for Mining) returns to a topic addressed in a 2016 essay (On exo-economics, published in the  compilation Between Crowds and Empires) in which the artist elaborates a critique of mineral extraction in celestial bodies, something that would indicate drastic economic and ecological changes. In this treemap the colored fields show the dollar valuation of asteroids close to the Earth, while the black fields show the possible profit share from the extraction of rare metals and water, according to the website asterank.com.

Untitled #4 (Value and Estimated Profit of 10 Most Cost-Effective Asteroids for Mining) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2019

Untitled #5 (Estimated Value and Profit of Asteroid 511 Davida (1903 LU) X Universal Basic Income for World Population of USD 5000 per month for 50 Years) also addresses the field of exo-economics, noting the value attributed to what would be the most valuable asteroid ever discovered. Valued at 15.38 quintillion dollars, Davida could generate a net profit of 1.06 quintillion. The lime green field serves as a scale by simulating the distribution of a fraction of that profit as basic income for all earthlings for 50 years.

Untitled #5 (Estimated Value and Profit of Asteroid 511 Davida (1903 LU) X Universal Basic Income for World Population of USD 5000 per month for 50 Years)
acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2019

Untitled #6 (Near-Earth Asteroids Discoveries, 2000-2020) uses information from NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Objects Studies that show the 20-year increase in the discovery of celestial bodies orbiting us, an information used by companies that are prospecting for asteroid mining to validate their extractive missions.

Untitled #6 (Near-Earth Asteroids Discoveries, 2000-2020) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2019

Untitled #7 (Brazilian Imports and Exports, Works of Art, HS97, 2010-2019) is a diptych gathering information on the trade in works of art made to/ from Brazil. Data from the World Trade Organization.

Untitled #7 (Brazilian Imports and Exports, Works of Art, HS97, 2010-2019) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | diptych | 20x20 cm (each) | 2019

The set Untitled #8 to Untitled #16 was built from data from the research on pre-tax income inequality (Alvaredo / Piketty), available in the World Inequality Database. Separated into 8 macro-regions of the world, the compositions present income shares concentrated by the richest 1%, the next  9%, the middle 40% and the bottom 50%. The ninth composition groups all available data, revealing an average of the values between the years 1990 to 2015.

Untitled #8 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Middle East and Northern Africa, 1990-2015) |acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #9 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Oceania, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #10 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Latin America, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #11 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #12 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Northern America, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #13 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Asia (excluding Middle East), 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #14 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Russia and Ukraine, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #15 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, Europe, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 20x20 cm | 2020

Untitled #16 (Pre-tax Income Inequality, World, 1990-2015) | acrylics, varnish, and ink marker on canvas | 40x40 cm | 2020